Video of how to self-inject

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Video of how to self-inject

Postby sophos » Wed Feb 04, 2009 6:56 am

Here is a video on how to self-inject B12! The presenter is a nurse, and the video was actually made for people who've had gastric bypass surgery, but the technique is of course the same.

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The link to the youtube video has been removed. The Pernicious Anaemia Society does not support the view that one can learn how to self-inject IM from watching a video. It is essential to get instructions from your health care provider or a qualified medical professional to learn how to self-inject properly to minimize the risk of injury.

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Postby anotherwithpa » Wed Feb 04, 2009 9:18 am

Gosh, good find!
Mind you I do not dart like that...did first time and monster bruise..now am far more gentle, there are areas on the leg that have no nerves, it takes practise but once you know were they are its painless to work slowly. That nurse does not warm up the liquid to be injected, mind you it must be difficult as it would have to be the seringe one would warm up to body temp, not the bottle as it has to be kept under 25 degrees c.
In the videa the liquid is injected very fast...it makes the jab more comfortable if you inject the liquid slowly, its quite thick stuff and pushes the muscle fibres appart, doing that slowly is more comfortable in my experience any way :lol: .

Here is a topic on how to make the jabs more comfortable:
http://pernicious-anaemia-society.org/p ... 9304#19304

And a topic on what can go wrong:
http://www.pernicious-anaemia-society.o ... ight=wrong
(Its a bit of a mess as it did not import well from a previous forum..)

Possible side effects with B12 treatment link:
http://www.pernicious-anaemia-society.o ... c.php?t=35

And in this topic:
http://www.pernicious-anaemia-society.o ... c.php?t=47
you will find links to immediate hypersensitivity reaction to cyanocobalamin but not hydroxycobalamin. Anaphylactic reaction after intramuscular injection of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12): a case report. Anaphylactic reaction to vitamin B12 appearing after several years of therapy.

Anaphylactic reaction to vitamin B12 is what I understand the most dangerous aspect of self-injecting. But am sure there are more dangers so it is terribly important you learn to do IM injections, are shown how by a qualified person and have regular monitoring and support for your long term condition.

Kind regards,
Marre.
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Postby kimks mom » Wed Feb 04, 2009 3:07 pm

Instructions in this video are clear but it would have been better had the instructor showed how to measure off the thigh area of the leg to find the correct area to inject.

There are many videos on B12 injections on Youtube. Some videos show SC injections and some IM injections. But a video is not the best instructor if you are a novice. Get your doctor's approval first and get proper instructions from a qualified health care provider.
I am a support person for my daughter who was diagnosed with PA and Folate Anaemia in 1994, at the age of 27. Another daughter diagnosed with Hashimotos 2010 but she doesn't have PA.
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Postby ine » Thu Feb 05, 2009 10:36 am

That was an interesting video. It clarified something for me and that is that injectable B12 comes in different containers depending on the country. I don't believe we have multi dose vials in Australia, just little one dose ampoules. Therefore we don't inject air into the container. Also, the actual technique used to give the injection was quite different to what I was taught when I trained as a nurse. I would never "throw' the needle in, though I agree that swiftness is best. As I stated in a previous post, I would not use the same needle to both draw up and inject. Though the needle needs to go well into the muscle, if the patient is thin, it may not be necessary to push the neeedle in so far.
I agree that it is probably best to seek instruction from your Dr or clinic nurse.
Cheers,
Ine.
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Postby OccamsRazor » Fri Feb 06, 2009 6:37 am

"castles are burning in my heart" ~Tori Amos
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Postby anotherwithpa » Fri Feb 06, 2009 8:00 am

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Postby anotherwithpa » Fri Feb 06, 2009 8:43 am

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Postby skeeter » Sat Feb 07, 2009 4:21 am

I think that each person with PA should decide for her/him self what the right treatment should be. We are all different...one treatment does not fit all. Some of us choose to self-inject...some of us don't...their is no right or wrong answer to this. So long as you get the best possible treatment for your PA...that's what counts.

TAKE CARE...SKEETER.
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Postby OccamsRazor » Sat Feb 07, 2009 6:40 am

"castles are burning in my heart" ~Tori Amos
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Postby ShellRN » Sun Feb 08, 2009 3:43 pm

--
Shellianne
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